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90Life Research  2019, Vol. 2 Issue (1): 14-21    DOI: 10.12032/life2019-0125-003
REPORT     
Using Qi flow in Taiji effecting structural change in feetand reduced pain: a case report
Newnham Suzanne*()
P.O. Box 720, Mawson ACT 2607, Australia.
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Abstract  

In the article, the author reports on a case study of chronic pain problems caused by her own foot deformity. The author began using Taiji, Chen style Chan Si Gong (Reeling Silk), and Zhan Zhuang (standing meditation) to relieve chronic pain since 1986. After more than two years of Qigong training, the structure of the author's foot changed from the previous deformity to normal foot shape. These changes enabled the author to walk normally and to be free from persistent chronic pain. The article discussed the methods of using Qi currents and other issues that need to be paid attention to when practicing Tai chi, such as how to adjust one's mental focus and maintain a state of relaxation to "mindful". Tai chi involves a number of internal "micro-adjusting" about how these techniques relax and strengthen muscles to reduce chronic pain. The report and discussion on the treatment principle of Qigong can provide new strategies for the treatment of chronic pain.



Key wordsQi      Taiji      chronic pain      Zhan Zhuang      foot deformity     
Received: 02 January 2019      Published: 20 January 2019
Corresponding Authors: Newnham Suzanne     E-mail: suzannenewnham@hotmail.com
Cite this article:

Newnham Suzanne. Using Qi flow in Taiji effecting structural change in feetand reduced pain: a case report. 90Life Research, 2019, 2(1): 14-21.

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https://www.tmrjournals.com/lr/EN/10.12032/life2019-0125-003     OR     https://www.tmrjournals.com/lr/EN/Y2019/V2/I1/14

Figure 1. Zhan Zhuang (Reeling Silk)
An essential basic for Taiji. Also known as "quiet standing", "standing like a pole". Arms are shown in "holding the balloon" posture. Anchoring feet in sand and then adjusting posture for uneven and unstable ground are important. Once the posture feels correct and strong the meditative part of Zhan Zhuang can develop for that session, thus allowing the body to auto-micro-adjust internally so the flow of Qi (chi - internal or vital energy) can move unimpeded along a given pathway.
Figure 2. Taiji poses, Brush Knee
Using Zhan Zhuang principles to spiral Qi through the upper body finishing one pose connecting Qi in Dantian with the lower hand, and simultaneously Qi to the fingers on the outstretched hand. In the lower body Qi flow spirals to Dantian from one leg and from the Ming-men (energy point VG4) down the other leg to the toes.
Figures 3. The foot condition referred to in this article is called "Metatarsus Adductus" or "Forefoot Adductus".
The pain was caused by chronic plantar fasciitis. The conditions and pain affected both feet. a. Left: Moderate metatarsus adductus with vertical alignment line. Right: Normal foot with vertical alignment line. Metatarsus Adductus causes the front half of the foot, or forefoot, to turn inward. Forefoot adduction is located in a pure transverse plane at Lisfranc’s joint. b. Lisfranc’s joint. The Lisfranc joint is the point at which the long (metatarsal) bones that lead up to the toes and the tarsal (in the arch) bones connect. The Lisfranc ligament is a tough band of tissue that joins two of these bones. This ligament is important for maintaining proper alignment and strength of the joint. c. Plantar fasciitis. This is an inflammation of a thick band of tissue that connects the heel bone to the toes. Area of chronic inflammation, pain, and limitation of movement prior to Qi flow training is shown. d. Left and right feet in January 2019. Structural change can be seen from Metatarsus Adductus (figure 3 image on left) after intensive practice of Taiji focusing on Qi flow. resulting in normal foot alignment in both feet.
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