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9TMR Non-Drug Therapy  2019, Vol. 2 Issue (3): 95-102    DOI: 10.12032/TMRND201902017
Acupuncture and moxibustion therapy     
Exploring the characteristics of acupoints in the treatment of stroke with complex network and point mutual information method
Jing-Chao Sun1, Yue-Yao Li1, Yu Xia1, Yi-Di Wang1, Yi-Xuan Jiang1, Yu-Qiu Li1,*()
1School of Acupuncture and Massage, Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jinan 250355, China.
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Highlights

This research finds that dredging the collaterals, dispelling wind-evil and restoring consciousness are the main principle of acupuncture for the treatment of stroke. Specific acupoints in head, face and climbs maybe the main targeted acupoints. Combination of Yang meridians with other meridians is needed to improve the effects. The acupoints Yangming meridian and Yangming-Shaoyang meridian are most used meridians, Hegu (LI4), Quchi (LI11) and Zusanli (ST36) are the most used acupionts.

Editor’s Summary

With complex network and point mutual information method, the authors explored the characteristics of meridian points in the treatment of stroke. This study found that the most commonly used treatment method is to dredge the meridian through multiple acupoints to improve the therapeutic effects of acupuncture. The traditional meridian treatment for stroke is mainly to dredge meridian Qi and blood to recover the motor function of paralyzed limbs. Researches have shown that the frequency of Yang meridian is much higher than that of Yin meridian. Yang meridian and Shaoyang meridian counts the most meridians. For the treatment of limbs powerless and activity obstacle, it should combine the Yang meridians with other meridians in order to obtain better curative effects. Hegu (LI4), Quchi (LI11) and Zusanli (ST36) are the most used acupionts.

Abstract

Objective: Explore the characteristics of acupoints in the treatment of stroke with complex network and point mutual information method. Methods: The complex network and point wise mutual information system-developed by Chinese academy of Chinese medical sciences wereused to analyze the specific acupoints, compatibility, frequency etc. Results: 174 acumoxibustion prescriptions were collected, including 163 acupoints. among them eighteen acupoints were used more than 30 times such as Hegu (LI4), Zusanli (ST36), Quchi (LI11) and Fengshi (GB31). The combinations of 31 acupoints were used more than 15 times, such as the combination of Quchi (LI11) and Zusanli (ST36), the combination of acupoint Quchi (LI11) and Jianyu(LI15) , Hegu and Quchi (LI11). The most commonly used treatment method for stroke treatment is to dredge the Yangming meridian and Shaoyang meridian through acupuncture the multiple acupoints located on these two meridians.. The commonly used acupoints are mainly distributed in the limbs, head and face. The most commonly used specific acupoint is intersection acupoint. The usage frequency of specific acupoints are higher than that of non-specific acupoints. Conclusion: Dredging the collaterals, dispelling wind-evil and restoring consciousness are the main principle for the treatment of stroke. Specific acupoints in head, face and climbs maybe the main targeted acupoints. Combination of Yang meridians with other meridians is needed to improve the effects. The Yangming meridian and Shaoyang meridian are most used meridians and Hegu (LI4), Quchi (LI11) and Zusanli (ST36) are the most used acupionts.



Key wordsAcupuncture      Stroke      Data mining      Complex network      Point mutual information method     
Received: 05 May 2019      Published: 04 September 2019
Corresponding Authors: Li Yu-Qiu   
E-mail: xiaoyusd@sina.com
Cite this article:

Jing-Chao Sun, Yue-Yao Li, Yu Xia, Yi-Di Wang, Yi-Xuan Jiang, Yu-Qiu Li. Exploring the characteristics of acupoints in the treatment of stroke with complex network and point mutual information method. 9TMR Non-Drug Therapy, 2019, 2(3): 95-102. doi: 10.12032/TMRND201902017

URL:

https://www.tmrjournals.com/ndt/EN/10.12032/TMRND201902017     OR     https://www.tmrjournals.com/ndt/EN/Y2019/V2/I3/95

Figure 1 Method of complex network of all acupoints
Number Acupoint Times Number Acupoint Times
1 LI4 267 10 ST6 73
2 ST36 249 11 DU26 69
3 LI11 232 12 ST4 63
4 GB31 192 13 GB24 57
5 LI15 159 14 GB30 48
6 GV20 148 15 CV24 40
7 GB39 121 16 GB20 37
8 BL60 120 17 LI10 36
9 GB34 108 18 GV14 31
Table 2 Acupoint appeared over 30 times
Portion Times Frequency Acupoints
Upper limb 5 27.78% LI4, LI11, LI15, GB24, LI10
Lower limb 6 33.33% ST36, GB31, GB39, BL60, GB34, GB30
Head and face 6 33.33% GV20, ST6, DU26, ST4, CV24, GB20
Chest abdomen back and waist 1 5.56% GV14
Table 3 The location of core acupoints
Meridian and collateral Times Frequency Acupoints
Yangming meridian 7 38.89% LI4, LI11, LI15, LI10, ST36, ST6, ST4
Shaoyang meridian 6 33.33% GB24, GB20, GB31, GB39, GB34, GB30
Conception vessel 3 16.67% GV20, DU26, GV14
Du meridian 1 5.56% GV24
Taiyang meridian 1 5.56% BL60
Table 4 Meridian tropism of core acupoints
Acupoints type Acupoints of attribute Times Acupoints
Specific Acupoints Crossing points 8 LI15, GV20, DU26, GB24, GB30, GV24, GB20, GV14
Five-Shu points 5 LI4, ST36, LI11, GB34, BL60
Eight influential 2 GB34, GB39
Non-Specific Acupoints None 4 GB31, ST6, ST4, LI10
Table 5 Attribute analysis on specific points of core acupoints
Figure 2 The compatibility of 18 core acupoints
Number Acupoint Times Number Acupoint Times
1 LI11-ST36 35 17 LI11-GB39 19
2 LI15-LI11 30 18 LI15-LI4 19
3 LI11-LI4 27 19 GB31-GB39 18
4 GB31-ST36 26 20 ST6-ST4 17
5 LI4-ST36 26 21 LI4-ST6 17
6 LI11-GB31 25 22 GB24-LI11 17
7 LI15-ST36 24 23 GV20-GB31 16
8 LI4-GB31 24 24 GB31-BL60 16
9 GV20-ST36 23 25 DU26-ST6 16
10 ST36-GB39 22 26 LI4-GB34 16
11 LI11-BL60 22 27 GB24-ST36 16
12 GV20-LI11 21 28 GB31-GB34 16
13 ST36-BL60 21 29 LI15-BL60 16
14 LI4-BL60 20 30 GB34-ST36 15
15 LI15-GB31 20 31 LI11-GB34 15
16 DU26-LI4 20
Table 6 The combination of core acupoints based on complex network analyses
Number Relevance Node degrees Times Acupoint
1 0.68 17 267 LI4
2 0.52 13 249 ST36
3 0.48 12 232 LI11
4 0.48 12 148 GV20
5 0.44 11 192 GB31
6 0.36 9 159 LI15
7 0.32 8 121 GB39
8 0.32 8 108 GB34
9 0.28 7 120 BL60
10 0.24 6 73 ST6
11 0.24 6 63 ST4
12 0.24 6 69 DU26
13 0.16 4 37 GB20
14 0.16 4 40 GV24
15 0.16 4 57 GB24
16 0.16 4 48 GB30
17 0.16 4 31 GV14
18 0.12 3 36 LI10
Table 7 Compatibility rule of core acupoints by acupoint mutual information method
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