Topics
Cupping

Cupping is a non-drug therapy of tradictionnal Chinese medicine which use heat to drain the air and creat negative pressure and draws on the skin and causes blood stasis on the skin. It is include cupping, moving cupping, extraction cupping, bleeding cupping, etc.
Please wait a minute...
Bloodletting Cupping Therapy for postherpetic neuralgia: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Qian Cui, Yu-Hui Ma, Xiao-Ming Jin, Lin-Feng Li, Guo-Wei Zhang
92Medical Data Mining    2018, 1 (2): 57-67.   https://doi.org/10.12032/mdm2018007
Abstract PDF (1808KB)  
Objective: To evaluate the clinical effects of bloodletting cupping therapy (BCT) for patients with postherpetic neuralgia. Methods: We comprehensively searched four Chinese databases (Wanfang, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP Database for Chinese Technical Periodicals,China Biology Medicine disc) and foreign databases (Pubmed, Cochrane Library). The retrieval time was from the build-up time to May 2018. RevMan 5.3 software was used for statistical analysis. Results: We finally obtained 18 eligible studies. Compared with routine western medicine, BCT can significantly improve PHN (OR= 7.45, 95% CI, 3.36-16.51, Z=4.95, P < 0.01). BCT plus other methods of acupuncture with fire needle and filiform needle has significant therapeutic effect (OR=5.54, 95% CI, 3.01-10.19, P < 0.01), BCT plus routine western medicine has significant therapeutic effect (OR=4.99, 95% CI, 2.73-9.11, P<0.00001). Conclusion: It showed that the therapeutic effects of BCT, BCT plus other acupuncture methods with fire needle and filiform needle, and BCT combined with western medicine are better than those treated with single western medicine. It is effective to treat postherpetic neuralgia with Bloodletting Cupping Therapy.
Brief introduction to the historical development and therapeutic effects of cupping therapy in traditional Chinese medicine
Ping Zhou, Wei-Jie Xie, Ping Zheng
9TMR Non-Drug Therapy    2019, 2 (1): 27-34.   https://doi.org/10.12032/TMRND201902006
Abstract HTML PDF (538KB)  

Highlights

This article gives an overview of the historical development, therapeutic effects and mechanism of cupping therapy practice and introduces a new and updated classification of cupping therapy.

Editor’s Summary

The earliest record of cupping in ancient times appeared in the Fifty-two Bingfang (B.C. 202~220, Han Dynasty) that demonstrated a detailed record of the use of "corn cupping" (horn-shaped) for treating diseases.

Abstract

Cupping therapy (CT) is an ancient traditional and complementary medicine practice. Recently, there has been a growing evidence of its potential benefits in the treatment of various diseases. The CT has been constantly developing with the emergence of various modern and improved cupping devices. It is now evident that cupping could adjust the Qi, blood, Yin and Yang, dredge the meridian, as well as relieve the effect of illness, achieve fitness and relative equilibrium of Yin-Yang. It exerts its effects through the negative pressure suction via the mechanical and thermal stimulations, and the negative pressure effects induced by cupping. This article gives an overview of CT practice, its historical development, as well as its therapeutic effects and mechanism. Furthermore, a new and updated classification of CT was briefly introduced.

Effects of comprehensive therapy of traditional Chinese medicine on pneumonia caused by influenza
Bing-Sheng Yuan
9TMR Non-Drug Therapy    2019, 2 (1): 9-12.   https://doi.org/10.12032/TMRND201902004
Abstract HTML PDF (504KB)  

Highlights

Comprehensive therapy consisting of acupuncture, sliding cup and Chinese herb has beneficial effect on pneumonia complicated by influenza.

Editor’s Summary

Acupuncture and sliding cup, as the methods of non-drug therapy, is possible to be introduced as part of comprehensive treatment modality for the management of respiratory diseases.

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the effects of comprehensive therapy of traditional Chinese medicine consisting of acupuncture, sliding cup and Chinese herb on a patient with pneumonia caused by influenza. Method: Needling the points of Zhaohai (KI 6), Lieque (LU 7), Chize (LU 5), Zhongwan (CV 12), Qihai (CV 6), Zusanli (ST 36), Yinxi (HT 6), Fuliu (KI 7), Neiguan (PC 6), Yuji (LU10), Fengchi (GB 20), Fengmen (BL 12), Dazhui (GV 14), Shenzhu (GV 12), Feishu (BL 13), Jueyinshu (BL 14) and Geshu (BL 17). After acupuncture, slide cupping was applied along the bladder meridian of foot-Taiyang on the back. The administration of Chinese herb of Xiaochaihu Soup combined Guizhi plus Houpuxingren Soup was also applied. Result: After the treatment, dyspnea relieved obviously and the symptoms of severe pain throughout the body, aversion to cold and high fever were eliminated. Conclusion: Comprehensive therapy consisting of acupuncture, sliding cup and Chinese herb has beneficial effects on pneumonia complicated by influenza.

Pricking cupping bloodletting combined with slide cupping for acne: a case report
Liang Bo, Liao Hui-Ling
TMR Non-Drug Therapy    2018, 1 (3): 119-122.   https://doi.org/10.12032/TMRND201801016
Abstract HTML PDF (1224KB)  

Highlights

Pricking cupping bloodletting combined with slide cupping can successfully relieve acne and promote skin healing.

Editor’s Summary

The earliest record about cupping was in the ancient book called 52 Bingfang, which was unearthed from Mawangdui tomb (B.C. 202~220, Han Dynasty) in Changsha, China in 1973.

Abstract

Objective: To report a patient with acne by using the combined treatment of pricking cupping bloodletting and slide cupping. Methods: Pricking cupping bloodletting was prescribed at the points of Feishu (BL13) in the bladder meridian of foot-Taiyang and Dazhui (DU14) in governor vessel and slide cupping was prescribed at the points on the back in the bladder meridian of foot-Taiyang. Results: Clinical manifestations revealed that acne and scar were significantly reduced after two courses. Conclusion: Pricking cupping bloodletting combined with slide cupping can successfully relieve acne and promote skin healing, which may provide us a new idea for the non-drug therapy of acne.

Preliminary studies on the mechanism of blistering cupping therapy
Chen Xiang-Hong, Chen Bo, Chen Ze-Lin, Li Meng-dan, Long Qin
TMR Non-Drug Therapy    2018, 1 (2): 53-59.   https://doi.org/10.12032/TMRND201801008
Abstract HTML PDF (6785KB)  

Highlights

The autogenetic inflammatory reaction of selected cupping area and formation of scar induced by blistering cupping was involved in mobilizing the immune response of whole body, thereby achieving favorable therapeutic effects.

Editor’s Summary

The present study preliminarily summaried the underlying mechanism of blistering cupping from the levels of biomechanics and molecular biology.

Abstract

Blistering cupping therapy, as a new type of cupping therapy, has attracted more and more attention of clinical doctor and scholars in home and abroad. Blistering cupping therapy achieves better effects through the formation of blistering fluid after suction. However, it is still controversial whether cupping induced blisters are beneficial to recovery of diseases, and the mechanism is still not completely clear. Here on the basis of the traditional cupping method, we aimed to identify the mechanism of blistering cupping from the levels of biomechanics and molecular biology. The negative pressure attraction induced by cupping suck should be of value in increasing pain threshold and relieving pain as well as improving the blood circulation and metabolism. Furthermore, the blistering fluid induced by cupping was the inflammatory substance actually that discharged through the superficial lymphatic vessels, including immunoglobulin, lysozyme, erythrocytes, etc. which could cause the autogenetic inflammatory reaction of selected cupping area, and further activated certain immune pathways including anti-oxidation, anti-apoptosis, tissue repairing and metabolic regulation. Besides, the formation of scar induced by blistering cupping was not only the result of excessive inflammatory response, but also involved in mobilizing the immune response.

First page | Prev page | Next page | Last page Page 1 of 1, 5 articles found  

TMR Data ExpandedMore

ScientistsMore

NoticesMore