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1Traditional Medicine Research  2018, Vol. 3 Issue (3): 148-156    DOI: 10.12032/TMR201811073
Modernization of Traditional Medicine     
Study of dual-directional regulatory effect of Banxia (Pinellia ternata) and Huanglian (Coptis chinensis) drug pair on gastrointestinal movement of mice
Yue Ji1#, Jun-Chen Li1#, Jing-Yan Meng1,*, Xue-Rou Yan1, Jian-ang Li1, Qing-Yun Zhao1, Kang Yang1, Chun- Liu1
1Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, China.
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Highlights

Banxia (Pinellia Ternate) and Huanglian (Coptis chinensis) drug pair has dual-directional regulatory effects on gastrointestinal movement in mice with atropine or neostigmine induced functional dyspepsia by modulating GAS, VIP, and SS levels in the intestine.

Editor’s Summary

Banxia (Pinellia ternata) and Huanglian (Coptis chinensis) drug pair was derived from Banxiaxiexin soup, which was first recorded in the Shanghanlun composed by Zhang Zhongjing in the third century (Eastern Han Dynasty of China).

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the regulatory effects of Banxia (Pinellia ternata, P) and Huanglian (Coptis chinensis, C) drug pair, derived from Banxiaxiexin soup, on the gastrointestinal movement of mice with functional dyspepsia. Methods: Mice were treated with different proportions of the P and C drug pair (1:1, 3:1, and 4:1) for 10 days, and subsequently injected with atropine (ATR) or neostigmine (NEO). The effects of the different proportions of P and C were evaluated based on the alvine advance rate. In addition, we used the same modeling method used in the first experiment and administered P: C at ratio of 3:1 and at different doses respectively (4.68 g/L, 2.34 g/L, and 1.17 g/L), and tested levels of the gastrointestinal hormones, gastrin (GAS), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), and somatostatin (SS) in the small intestinal tissue using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: In the groups of NEO-induced mice, P:C at ratios of 1:1, 3:1, and 4:1 significantly reduced the alvine advance rate compared with the NEO model group (P = 0.003, P = 0.012 and P = 0.021, respectively). In the groups of ATR-induced mice, only P:1 at ratio of 3:1 significantly increased the alvine advance rate compared with the ATR model group (P = 0.007). After exposure to P: C at ratio of 3:1 and at different dose, the GAS level was lower in the low-, medium-, and high-dose NEO groups than that in the NEO model group (P = 0.001, P = 0.004, and P = 0.003, respectively). The VIP levels were higher in the medium-and high-dose NEO groups than that in the NEO model group (P = 0.004 and P = 0.002, respectively). In addition, the SS level increased in the NEO medium-dose group compared with that in the NEO model group (P = 0.002). The GAS level was higher in the ATR medium- and high-dose groups than in the ATR model group (P = 0.007 and P = 0.021, respectively). The VIP level was lower in the ATR low-, medium-, and high-dose than that in the ATR model group (P = 0.001, P = 0.001, and P = 0.001, respectively). Furthermore, the SS level was lower in the ATR medium- and high-dose groups than that in the ATR model group (P = 0.001 and P = 0.006). Conclusion: The PC drug pair bidirectionally adjusted the NEO- and ATR-induced functional dyspepsia in mice by modulating GAS, VIP, and SS levels in the intestine.



Key wordsFunctional dyspepsia      Traditional Chinese medicine      Banxia (Pinellia ternate)      Huanglian (Coptis chinensis)     
Published: 04 May 2018
Fund:  Funding: This work was supported by a grant from National College Students’ Innovative Entrepreneurial Training Plan (20151006308).
Corresponding Authors: Meng Jing-Yan   
About author: #These authors contributed equally to this work.
Cite this article:

Yue Ji, Jun-Chen Li, Jing-Yan Meng, Xue-Rou Yan, Jian-ang Li, Qing-Yun Zhao, Kang Yang, Chun- Liu. Study of dual-directional regulatory effect of Banxia (Pinellia ternata) and Huanglian (Coptis chinensis) drug pair on gastrointestinal movement of mice. 1Traditional Medicine Research, 2018, 3(3): 148-156. doi: 10.12032/TMR201811073

URL:

https://www.tmrjournals.com/tmr/EN/10.12032/TMR201811073     OR     https://www.tmrjournals.com/tmr/EN/Y2018/V3/I3/148

Groups (n = 10 each) Alvine advance rate (%)
Blank control A 76.50 ± 1.41
NEO model 85.73 ± 5.43a
1:1 NEO 75.99 ± 5.04b
3:1 NEO 74.81 ± 5.90c
4:1 NEO 81.91 ± 5.23d
Table 1 Alvine advance rate in a mouse model of NEO-induced intestinal peristaltic propulsion treated with different proportions of PC drug pair
Groups (n = 10) Alvine advance rate (%)
Blank control B 76.76 ± 1.44
ATR model 54.10 ± 5.58a
1:1 ATR 49.97 ± 5.23
3:1 ATR 66.48 ± 3.45b
4:1 ATR 63.08 ± 2.46
Table 2 Alvine advance rate in a mouse model of ATR-induced intestinal peristaltic inhibition treated with different proportions of PC drug pair
Figure 1 The hormone levels of PC 3:1 on NEO induced intestinal peristaltic propulsive model

(A) The GAS hormone levels of PC 3:1 on NEO induced intestinal peristaltic propulsive model were tested. Data are presented as mean ± SD. a: NEO model group vs Blank control group, P = 0.001; b: NEO low-dose group vs NEO model group, P = 0.001; c: NEO middle group vs NEO model group, P = 0.004; d: NEO high group vs NEO model group, P = 0.003. (B) The VIP hormone levels of PC 3:1 on NEO induced intestinal peristaltic propulsive model were tested. Data are presented as mean ± SD. a: NEO model group vs Blank control group, P = 0.004; b: NEO middle group vs NEO model group, P = 0.004; c: NEO high group vs NEO model group, P = 0.002. (C) The SS hormone levels of PC 3:1 on NEO induced intestinal peristaltic propulsive model were tested. Data are presented as mean ± SD. a: NEO model group vs Blank control group, P = 0.003; b: NEO middle group vs NEO model group, P = 0.002.
NEO, Neostigmine; SD, Standard deviation; GAS, Gastrin; SS, Somatostatin; VIP, Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide; P, Banxia (Pinellia ternata); C, Huanglian (Coptis chinensis).

Figure 2 The hormone levels of PC 3:1 on ATR induced intestinal peristaltic inhibition model
(A) The GAS hormone levels of PC 3:1 on ATR induced intestinal peristaltic inhibition model were tested. Data are presented as mean ± SD. a: ATR model group vs Blank control group, P = 0.007; b: NEO middle group vs NEO model group, P = 0.007; c: NEO high group vs NEO model group, P = 0.021. (B) The VIP hormone levels of PC 3:1 on ATR induced intestinal peristaltic inhibition model were tested. Data are presented as mean ± SD. A: ATR model group vs Blank control group, P = 0.002; b: ATR low dose group vs NEO model group, P = 0.001; c: ATR middle group vs NEO model group, P = 0.001; d, ATR high group vs NEO model group, P = 0.001. (C) The SS hormone levels of PC 3:1 on ATR induced intestinal peristaltic inhibition model were tested. Data are presented as mean ± SD. a: ATR model group vs Blank control group, P = 0.004; b: ATR middle group vs NEO model group, P = 0.001; c: ATR high group vs NEO model group, P = 0.006.
ATR, Atropine; NEO, Neostigmine; SD, Standard deviation; GAS, Gastrin; SS, Somatostatin; VIP, Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide; P, Banxia (Pinellia ternata); C, Huanglian (Coptis chinensis).
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