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1Traditional Medicine Research  2019, Vol. 4 Issue (5): 237-245    DOI: 10.12032/TMR20190905134
Special Issue on Inflammation and Immunity     
Quantitation of phytochemical constituents of Fumaria vaillantii L. with different extract methods
Fahimeh Mohajerani1,2, Zeinab Pourjabbar2, Fatemeh Zamani Mazdeh3, Roja Rahimi1, Gholam-Reza Amin2, Tayebeh Toliyat4, Sareh Kargar2, Mannan Hajimahmoodi1,2,3,*()
1Persian Medicine and Pharmacy Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 1416753955, Iran
2Drug and Food Control Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 1416753955, Iran
3Food and Drug Administration, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 1416753955, Iran
4Pharmaceutical Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 1416753955, Iran.
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Highlights

Total phenolic, total flavonoid, total alkaloid, ascorbic and organic acids yields in Fumaria vaillantii L. aerial parts with different extract methods are evaluated and compared by spectrophotometric and HPLC methods.

Abstract

Objective: The genus fumaria includes more than 40 species in the world. The aim of this study was to quantify the phytochemical constituents of Fumaria vaillantii L. aerial parts and compare the different methods of extraction. Total phenol, total flavonoid, total alkaloid, ascorbic and organic acids (oxalic, maleic, citric, succinic and fumaric acids) yields were evaluated in terms of the temperature effect, type of solvent and maceration time. Methods: Dried plant samples were extracted by different procedures. Total phenolic, total flavonoid, total alkaloid and ascorbic acid yields were determined by spectrophotometric methods. Also, the organic acid yields were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography method. Results: With the same extraction method, the natural flora extract was showed more yields of oxalic, maleic and citric acids than the commercial one, while the commercial extract was showed more yields of total phenol, ascorbic, succinic and fumaric acids than the natural flora one. The water-boiled extract was showed more yields of total phenol and total flavonoid. The macerated in ethanol 80% extract was also demonstrated more amounts of total alkaloid and ascorbic acid. Among different aqueous macerated extracts of the commercial sample, as the maceration time increased, total phenol, total flavonoid, oxalic, maleic, succinic, fumaric and ascorbic acids yields decreased. Macerated commercial dried fumitory in double-distilled water for 24 hrs resulted in an extract with the highest possible fumaric acid yield. Conclusion: It can be concluded that both water-boiled and macerated in ethanol 80% extracts can be used as rich sources of total phenolic and total flavonoid, which are considered as the important antioxidants.



Key wordsTotal phenolic      Total flavonoid      Total alkaloid      Organic acid      Fumaria vaillantii L.      
Received: 27 February 2019      Published: 05 September 2019
Fund:  This work was supported by a grant from Persian Medicine and Pharmacy Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran numbers 94-03-96-30194 & 95-03-96-32757.
Corresponding Authors: Hajimahmoodi Mannan   
E-mail: hajimah@sina.tums.ac.ir
Cite this article:

Fahimeh Mohajerani, Zeinab Pourjabbar, Fatemeh Zamani Mazdeh, Roja Rahimi, Gholam-Reza Amin, Tayebeh Toliyat, Sareh Kargar, Mannan Hajimahmoodi. Quantitation of phytochemical constituents of Fumaria vaillantii L. with different extract methods. 1Traditional Medicine Research, 2019, 4(5): 237-245. doi: 10.12032/TMR20190905134

URL:

https://www.tmrjournals.com/tmr/EN/10.12032/TMR20190905134

Extract no. Extract method Yields (%)
1 Commercial sample boiled in double distilled water for 15 mins 43.9
2 Commercial sample macerated in ethanol 80% for 24 hrs 20.3
3 Commercial sample macerated in double distilled water for 72 hrs 14.2
4 Commercial sample macerated in double distilled water for 48 hrs 14.1
5 Commercial sample macerated in double distilled water for 24 hrs 16.9
6 Natural flora sample macerated in double distilled water for 24 hrs 12.8
Table 1 Yields in the extraction of 100 g of dried aerial parts
Analyzed content Reference standard Concentration range of standard solutions
(μg mL-1)
Calibration equation Correlation coefficient (R2) LOD
(μg mL-1)
LOQ
(μg mL-1)
Total phenolic Gallic acid 25-125 y = 0.0061x – 0.0184 0.998 6.087 18.446
Total flavonoid Quercetin 10-100 y = 0.0216x + 0.0748 0.9997 2.139 6.481
Total alkaloid Atropine 10-50 y = 0.0165x – 0.0263 0.998 2.623 7.948
Ascorbic acid Ascorbic acid 10-50 y = 0.0242x + 0.1581 0.999 2.697 8.174
Table 2 Analytical characteristics of the method validation for different spectrophotometric methods
Analyzed organic acid Concentra-tion range of standard solutions
(μg mL-1)
Calibration equation Correlation coefficient (R2) LOD
(μg mL-1)
LOQ
(μg mL-1)
Concentration of spiked solution
(μg mL-1)
Recovery (%)
Oxalic acid 1-30 y = 0.4142x - 0.2759 0.9999 0.254 0.769 10 93.60
Maleic acid 0.5-20 y = 2.9136x + 0.423 0.9999 0.155 0.471 5 90.34
Citric acid 5-60 y = 0.0394x - 0.0031 0.9998 1.101 3.065 20 92.49
Succinic acid 5-60 y = 0.016x + 0.0188 0.9997 0.993 3.010 20 94.20
Fumaric acid 1-30 y = 2.9187x + 0.8682 1 0.117 0.355 10 97.80
Table 3 Analytical characteristics of the method validation for HPLC method
Extract no. Total phenolic
(mg GaE/g DW)
Total flavonoid
(mg QE/g DW)
Total alkaloid (mg AtE/g DW) Ascorbic acid (mg ascorbic acid/g DW)
1 5.481 ± 0.005 5.585 ± 0.085 0.537 ± 0.001 0.106 ± 0.004
2 2.526 ± 0.007 3.646 ± 0.061 1.009 ± 0.001 0.737 ± 0.039
3 0.999 ± 0.002 0.558 ± 0.040 0.352 ± 0.003 0.342 ± 0.012
4 1.078 ± 0.008 0.592 ± 0.038 0.266 ± 0.002 0.352 ± 0.017
5 1.108 ± 0.005 0.855 ± 0.028 0.615 ± 0.001 0.546 ± 0.005
6 0.722 ± 0.004 0.892 ± 0.026 0.650 ± 0.001 0.486 ± 0.014
Table 4 Yields of total phenol, flavonoid, alkaloid and ascorbic acid (mg/g DW) of Fumaria vaillantii L.
Extract no. Oxalic acid Maleic acid Citric acid Succinic acid Fumaric acid
1 0.2551 ± 0.0008 0.0325 ± 0.0006 2.3596 ± 0.021 12.8921 ± 0.08 0.9224 ± 0.011
2 ND ND 0.7166 ± 0.012 3.9926 ± 0.039 0.9306 ± 0.015
3 0.0703 ± 0.0009 ND 0.5818 ± 0.010 0.6855 ± 0.013 0.1879 ± 0.003
4 0.0895 ± 0.0017 0.0627 ± 0.0012 1.9393 ± 0.025 1.4637 ± 0.028 0.6529 ± 0.005
5 0.0896 ± 0.0016 0.0905 ± 0.0017 1.3977 ± 0.026 8.5063 ± 0.044 1.3372 ± 0.023
6 0.2107 ± 0.0040 0.1785 ± 0.0026 2.9703 ± 0.024 4.0427 ± 0.037 0.0244 ± 0.0002
Table 5 Yields of organic acid (mg/g) DW of Fumaria vaillantii L. aerial parts
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